Mixed Pork Gravy (Low Carb & Healthy Options)

 

If you’ve been following my Grocery Fast, you know that I have been trying for eight weeks to not spend much money at the grocery store but instead use up my many food stores in my pantries, cupboards, freezers, and refrigerators. (And then I’m hoping to learn to shop and cook for two of us—wish me luck!) I found a few bags of “pork” (mostly turkey products) in my freezer that I couldn’t see using as main entrees since there were bits and pieces. But with my quest to really use up all of these “bits and pieces,” my mind went crazy trying to figure out how to make a meal (another benchmark is that I am making MEALS out of what I have, not just side dishes or “add ons” to meals) out of this combination. I had been so hungry for biscuits and gravy, but with our OMAD (One Meal a Day)/Daily Intermittent Fasting), I can’t fit all the meals in that I am hungry for. (IF problems!) So I set out to make “Mixed ‘Pork’ Gravy” with these little bags of frozen meats.

 

I will give you the verdict before the instructions. I liked it a lot. Satisfied my “biscuits and gravy” craving (even though I had it over low carb toast), and I even enjoyed leftovers as a snack to open my eating window throughout the next week. (It takes soooo long to use up food with only one meal a day and two people!) However, my husband didn’t like it very well. He has been getting pickier (again, probably the OMAD thing!) as he gets older because he used to like anything and everything. I also wanted to say, “There’s no reason not to like that….you order all of those meats on pizza and love it!” But I didn’t.

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in this recipe. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

So here are some tips before I loosely give you the “recipe” for the gravy.

(I didn’t measure anything….I never do with any kind of gravy, so those recipes are hard to share on a blog!):

 

1)  I like a lot of meat in my gravy. However, this can be made with very little amounts of “bits and pieces” if you don’t mind being “lean” on the meats. Mine was loaded with meats as you can see in the skillet before I added the almond milk and cream.

 

Here are my “bits and pieces” of “pork”—bacon bits, thick ham slice, turkey sausage links, and turkey sausage rounds.

 

2) Any milks or creams will do (as long as they are not sweet). The more “creamy” your milks (i.e. whipping cream rather than milk, etc.), the more fattening your dish will be—but it will probably be yummier too! ? You will also need less thickener if you use cream.

 

3)  I use bases extensively to cook with. I know they’re not considered “health foods,” but they add so much flavor without added calories, fat, or carbs. I even stir fry meats and vegetables in a little base and water, red wine, aminos (or soy sauce), and seasonings. However, all bases (chicken, beef, ham/pork/smoke house, and vegetable) are salty. Therefore, do not add salt until you are ready to taste at the end. (I also “enrich” the flavors of broth and bone broth with added base.)

 

4) All of my meats were precooked. If you are using any of these meats in their raw state, you could keep some of the grease in your pan, make a roux with sprouted white flour, and add even more flavor (and not have to thicken as much at the end).

 

Since my meats were already cooked, I just defrosted them, added them to my skillet, and heated them before adding my liquids and seasoning.

 

 

5) I thickened my gravy with xantham gum and stirred into some of the liquid from the pan because I didn’t have any corn starch, and I wanted to do a little more “gravy and soup thickening test” with xantham gum for another article I recently wrote. Next time I would use corn starch mixed in cold water. (See next tip.)

 

6) As for “healthier” or low carb thickeners, I recently wrote an article about seventeen of them. Check it out here. I use xantham gum in stews and soups and even in my Very Low Carb Flour Mix to help bind things, but gravies are tricky to get the right consistency without changing the flavor. I would use corn starch and cold water for gravy personally. (The article gives the carb count and how many carbs per serving you would add to a dish if using corn starch to thicken.) Here are my thoughts for this recipe:

a. Adding cream cheese would add a boatload of calories and fat to the gravy before it got it to gravy consistency. If you are truly keto/LCHF and not concerned about fat and calories, you could start with some loose cream cheese then move on to something stronger.

b. Xantham gum did not give it the texture of gravy. It helped thicken it some, but it definitely wasn’t “normal” sausage gravy thick. Go slowly on the xantham gum, following the instructions in my Thickening article.

c. Corn starch has the next to the strongest thickening power out there (next to arrowroot). It simply doesn’t take very much to do the job—and would not add very many carbs per serving. I believe it makes the best gravy.

 

I used what I had on hand for liquids—a little whipping cream and unflavored, unsweetened almond milk.

 

 

7) I served mine over low carb toast. (Anybody else use their Air Fryer for toast? One less appliance that I have to have out on the counter!) You could also make my delicious low carb biscuits to go with these. (And then make my amazing crock pot apple butter to have on a biscuit for dessert!)

 

The finished product wasn’t overly thick—I would use cornstarch and water next time. (See Tips before recipe.)

 


Mixed Pork Gravy (Low Carb & Healthy Options)
Author: 
Serves: Serves several
 
Nutritional Count Based on Your Amounts (almond milk & cream are extremely low carb as are meats)
Ingredients
  • Mixed meats (sausage links, kielbasa, ground sausage, bacon, ham)
  • Milks of your choice (choose your favorite—almond milk, milk, half & half, cream, etc.)
  • Pork/Ham/Smokehouse Base
  • Seasoning of your choice—preferably salt free (I use my Favorite Seasoning Mix)
  • Corn starch or other thickener
Instructions
  1. Cook meats if they are not precooked.
  2. Cut meats into tiny pieces. (I used kitchen shears for this.)
  3. If desired, use some grease from the meat to make a flour and grease roux before adding liquid.
  4. If not making roux, be sure meat is hot and add it to the pan.
  5. Pour in milks of your choice and heat thoroughly. I also add some base mixed in a little bit of the liquid, seasonings, etc.
  6. Heat all til boiling and thicken with corn starch and cold water whisked together or xantham gum (or other thickening choice).
  7. Serve over toast or biscuits.

PIN THIS RECIPE!

Cheapest, “Normal-Tasting” Low Carb Flour Mix

Cheapest Normal Tasting Low Carb Flour Mix

 

Low carbers, gluten-free folks, Paleo peeps, and real foodies all have their favorite flour and flour combinations when it comes to baking healthier (or lower carb, or gluten-free, or real, etc). Most people who use alternative flours focus on their specific need or preference–whether they want fewer carbs, no grains at all, nothing processed, etc. Two things that are sometimes overlooked in this quest are how “normal tasting” the flour substitute is and the cost of the substitute. I know there are die hard healthy bakers who would never use a grain or never use a flour with over a dozen carbs….but there are others who are trying to navigate these new baking waters (especially those of us seeking lower carb who are not used to the unusual flavors or those who have sticker shock when they start purchasing low carb flour substitutes).

I like both of my flour mixes. And I use them for different purposes. Anyway I “slice” it, almond flour-based mixes do not yield good yeast breads for me. And sprouted flours only are still a little high for every day use when someone is trying to stay under fifty carbs or so. (Check out my two flour mixes here, or click on the image below to download a printable PDF of this chart.)

 

 

 

But I’ll be the first to admit that neither flour mix is “cheap” or inexpensive. They require numerous flours and many ingredients. (You should have seen my Amazon bills during the two years of testing them! 🙂 )

 

A reader recently asked about a comment that I made in a post about my flour mixes in which I said that you could try a combination of sprouted flour and almond flour to get a more reasonably-priced, simpler flour combination. She asked if this would work for yeast products, such as my sprouted flour crescent dough and low carb sprouted dinner rolls.

 

 

So…I give you my suggestion for the Cheapest, “Normal-Tasting” Low Carb Flour Mix–with several suggestions for using it to create lower carbed baked goods!

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in the recipe above. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

 

Cheapest, "Normal-Tasting" Low Carb Flour Mix
Author: 
 
Net carbs per cup: 35
Ingredients

PIN THIS RECIPE!

Here are the deets for this low carb flour mix:

1) This can be used in non-yeast products as is, including my biscuits, crepes, chocolate cake, and oopsie rolls.

 

2) It can be used in place of other low carb flour mixes or almond flour alone.

 

3) It is a low carb flour mix when compared to regular wheat flours (35 carbs per cup vs over 100 carbs per cup) and even when compared to coconut flour (at 24 carbs per cup). It isn’t almost no carbs (like almond flour at 12 carbs), but when you use, say, two cups of this mix spread out over 20 servings of something, you are at 3.5 carbs per serving; spread out over 10 servings, you are at 7 carbs per serving. These are low carb final products!

 

4) The taste is pretty “normal”! This would be a great starting mix for the new low carb cook.

 

 

 

 

5) Note that I use the finely-ground almond flour linked in the recipe and white sprouted wheat flour. Another almond flour that is not so finely ground will not yield the same texture. And a different sprouted flour might be higher in net carbs.

 

6) Obviously, if you are gluten-free, the sprouted flour would not be a good choice since it does contain gluten.

 

7) Finally, in answer to the reader about using a half-and-half combination like this in yeast products:

a. Half almond flour and half sprouted white flour will likely not rise in yeast baked goods. It is too heavy for yeast baking.

 

b. In my testing of diluting white sprouted flours with low carb items (gluten, sprouted wheat flour, and protein powder), there was a definite point where too much of the low carb product hindered the rise of the yeast product. I finally settled in at 80% sprouted white and wheat flour (with a 3:1 ratio of those) and 20% gluten/protein powder.

 

c. So…..if I wanted to try yeast dough using this combination rather than my Sprouted Low Carb Flour Mix, I would do something like this:

i. Start out with 2 cups white sprouted and 1/2 cup almond flour. (I would also add a TBSP or two of vital wheat gluten.) This will yield 48 net carbs per cup, which is still way under half of typical wheat flour!

ii. If that works well for you, you can keep trying to lower the white sprouted and increase the almond flour….at a 2:1 ratio (for example, 2 cups sprouted white and 1 cup almond…again, throw in two TBSP wheat gluten), your net carb count would be 41 carbs per cup. OR you can use half sprouted white and half sprouted wheat for the two cups and 1 cup almond flour….test this out with half a recipe to see what happens!

iii. Try these combinations in my sprouted crescent dough–and let me know how they work! 🙂

 

 

I know that last one is a lot of math—but I really want to help people simplify their baking while still being lower in carbs while having a normal tasting bread–if that is what they want. (And I understand the desire to save money on your baking AND the desire to bake things that others enjoy too!)

 

Happy low carb baking!

 


Two Low Carb Flour Mixes and Their Uses

2 Flour Mixes & Their Uses

 

Since I published my two low carb flour mixes, I have gotten questions concerning when to use each one, etc. So until I get the dozens of recipes up that go with each mix, I thought I would write a general post about the mixes, direct you to some recipes using them, etc. So this post will detail more about my Very Low Carb Flour Mix and my Sprouted Low Carb Flour Mix!

 

First of all, check out the handy chart that shows carb counts in each of my flour mixes as well as other low carb (and non low carb) flours.

PIN THIS CHART HERE!

Here’s a handy list about my two flour mixes:

 

Very Low Carb Flour Mix

1) Great alternative for almond flour, coconut flour, or other low carb combination

2) Dilutes the flavors of the low carb flours so you don’t taste one specific one over the others

3) Has lower fat count than almond flour alone and lower carb count than coconut flour alone

4) Is more user-friendly in substituting for “regular” flours than any one low carb flour

5) Is great for crusts, cookies, bars, breading, muffins, quick breads, and more

6) Does not work for yeast products as it is missing gluten, which causes baked goods to rise (in substituting, if a recipe calls for almond flour, you can use this mix)

7) Is “very” low carb because of the very low carb products that are used to make this mix

8) Is lower in calories than almond flour

Click here for the Very Low Carb Flour Mix recipe!

 

Sprouted Low Carb Flour Mix

1) Great alternative for times you want to make yeast products or want something to be low to moderate in carbs but want people who are “very low carb flour” skeptics to enjoy it too

2) Has a lower fat count than almond flour and slightly higher carb count than coconut flour

3) Is super user friendly in low carb and regular recipes

4) Is great for everything, including yeast products and thickening

5) DOES work for yeast products—though you will need to experiment (see my “Crescent Roll Dough” recipe for ideas)

6) Is low/moderate in carbs (wayyyy lower than most wheat or white flour combinations…much closer to coconut flour in carb count) because of the diluting of the higher carb products

7) Is lower in calories than most

Click here for the Sprouted Low Carb Flour Mix

 

Here are some uses for each of these mixes. Click or tap on the images below to view the recipes:

 

BEST Low Carb Biscuits

Incredible Chocolate Cake [Low Carb, Gluten Free, Sugar-Free, THM]

 

Low Carb Sprouted Crescent Roll Dough Recipe

 

And you can visit my Healthy Mixes page for even more great recipes using these flours!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P.S. What recipes would you like to see using either of these mixes? I have probably already been testing it! 🙂

9 Low Carb Flours and Their Nutritional Info (Infograph for Easy Reference!)

9 Low Carb Flours and Their Nutritional Info (Infograph for Easy Reference!)

 

In my four years of low carb baking and cooking, I have tried them all. Some have turned out great. And some not so great. Baking with low carb “flours” can be challenging. They just don’t act like the flours we are used to baking with. They don’t taste like them either! So what do you do with almond flour, coconut flour, flax, oat fiber, and more? Which low carb flours are truly low and which are not? What about incorporating other flours together to make a more acceptable-to-family flour mix or flour blends?

 

read more…

Incredible Low Carb Chocolate Cake (THM S or E; Gluten-Free; Sugar-Free)

Incredible Chocolate Cake [Low Carb, Gluten Free, Sugar-Free, THM]

 

This cake is perfect for all types of yummy desserts!

Don’t forget to scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page for this recipe’s helpful Recipe Keys!

 

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in the recipe above. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

Incredible Chocolate Cake [Low Carb, Gluten Free, Sugar-Free, THM]

Delicious chocolate cupcakes!

 

Incredible Low Carb Chocolate Cake (THM S or E; Gluten-Free)
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • butter and flour for coating and dusting the cake pan
  • 1½ cups Very Low Carb Flour Mix* (or other other low carb baking blend with ½ almond flour and ½ other ingredients)
  • 1¼ cups granulated Pyure (or Gentle Sweet or Homemade Pyure or other stevia blend or double a cup-for-cup sugar substitute)
  • ¾ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ½ TBSP baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 2 large eggs
  • ⅔ cup almond milk or buttermilk or half and half
  • ½ cup sour cream or yogurt
  • ¾ cup warm water
  • ¼ cup melted butter or oil
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Butter pans. Dust with flour and tap out the excess.
  3. Mix together flour, Pyure, cocoa, baking soda, baking powder, and salt in a stand mixer using a low speed until combined.
  4. Add eggs, buttermilk, warm water, butter/oil, and vanilla.
  5. Beat on a medium speed until smooth. This should take just a couple of minutes.
  6. Pour batter into one 9x13; two rounds; or 18 to 24 cupcake wells (depending on size of cupcakes you want).
  7. Bake for 30-35 minutes until toothpick in center of cake comes out clean. (Convection oven: 22 to 28 minutes.)
  8. Cool on wire racks for 15 minutes and then turn out the cakes onto the racks and allow to cool completely.
  9. Frost with your favorite frosting and enjoy!
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1 piece Calories: 84 Fat: 6 Carbohydrates: 3 Sugar: 1 Protein: 3

 

PIN THIS RECIPE!

Save

Save

Save

Save


Recipe Keys

 

Very Low Carb (VLC): These are very low carb. My Very Low Carb Flour Mix has like a dozen carbs per cup!

 

Family-Friendly (FF): Super family-friendly. I don’t think any child or adult would know that these are made with Very Low Carb Flour Mix and sugar-free sweetener.

 

Store-Bought-Stella (SBS): Lots of ingredients but really not hard to mix up. You can buy a premade low carb baking mix to use in my recipes calling for Very Low Carb Flour Mix, if desired.

 

Homemade Hannah (HH): Homemade chocolate cake….ahhh…

 

Freezer Cooking (FC): These freeze fine. I keep them in my freezer to grab when I have a chocolate cookie craving and candy will not fill it!

 

Trim Healthy Mama-Friendly (THM) (www.trimhealthymama.com): This is an S cake. I suppose it could move into E territory by using half Very Low Carb Flour Mix and half Oat Fiber (no carbs, no fat) and by using almond milk, fat free yogurt, and omitting the butter. Let me know if you try this!

 

Sugar Free (SF): Of course, you will want to use unsweetened cocoa, but this is very sugar-free.

 

Gluten-Free (GF): Yes! My Very Low Carb Flour Mix is gluten free!

Low Carb Crepes [Wraps, Bread, & Lasagna Substitute]

Low Carb Crepes

 

My pasta, lasagna, wrap problems have been solved! DJ Foodie from Low Carb and Loving It recommended using crepes for lasagna and wrap substitutes, and I took his advice–now I always have a container full of savory and a container full of sweet crepes in my freezer, ready to make wraps, lasagna, noodle soup, noodles with sauce (red or white), tuna noodle casserole….you name it, I can make it–VERY LOW CARB!

 

Unlike zucchini noodles, chicken noodles, almond flour dumplings, cheese noodles (!), etc., these actually DO taste like pasta. You can see in the bowl above how they really do look like a noodle (and taste like one!). Amazing!

 

 

Some tips for using the crepes:

 

1. Store them in the freezer separated by parchment, wax paper, etc. (or they might stick together and fall apart when you try to remove them). This also allows you to get one out at a time–quick chicken noodle soup for one? Broth, a little shredded chicken from your freezer, seasonings, slice a crepe into it–voila–chicken noodle soup at four or five carbs total instead of thirty from a can!

 

Savory Crepes - Cold meat, cheese stick, and spicy mustard!

Savory Crepes – Cold meat, cheese stick, and spicy mustard!

 

2. They are great as wraps. If you are tired of rolled up meat and string cheese snacks–make a wrap! You can afford it carb-wise with these crepes!

 

3. To use in recipes like spaghetti, casserole, etc., I just slice them the size I want and fold them in. For recipes like soups or broth-based uses, I prefer to fold them in when serving, so they don’t dissolve by sitting in broth too long.

 

Low Carb Crepes

 

4. For lasagna, enchilada casserole, baked burrito casserole, or any Mexican layered casserole, I just slice them to the right size (like lasagna noodles) and place them directly in my casserole.

 

5. They do not crisp well (because of the egg and cream cheese), so I do not recommend trying to crisp them like you would Joseph’s pitas or Missions low carb tortillas.

 

6. These are SUPER low carb (depending on the flour you use–I use a combination of those flours listed in the recipe and sometimes I even use unflavored protein powder for part!). So even those on induction type low carb diets, Trim Healthy Mama (S meals), etc., can probably use these!

 

Crepes sliced and made into chicken noodle soup!

Crepes sliced and made into chicken noodle soup!

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in this recipe. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

4.3 from 3 reviews
Low Carb Crepes [Wraps, Bread, & Lasagna Substitute]
Author: 
Serves: 10 crepes
 
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. In food processor, pulse eggs and cream cheese until smooth.
  2. Add remaining ingredients and process until smooth. (Do not add half and half or cream until all ingredients are pulsed—and add a little at a time.)
  3. Heat a small 6 “ non-stick pan, spray with cooking spray.
  4. Using ¼ cup of batter, pour first crepe into skillet.
  5. Tilt pan to spread out batter evenly and cook over medium heat.
  6. When one side is done, flip crepe and cook five to ten seconds on second side.
  7. Set aside in a plate and cook remaining crepes.
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1 crepe Calories: 40 Fat: 3 Carbohydrates: 1 Protein: 3

PIN THIS RECIPE!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save


Not-So-Oopsie Rolls

Not So Oopsie Rolls

.

 

Revolution rolls. Oopsie buns. Cloud bread. Variations of this bread/bun/roll are all over the internet. Some have said that Dr. Atkins himself invented the original recipe, the revolution roll.

Below are links to the ingredients I use in the recipe above. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

I’m not sure where the recipes originated, but I do know that when I added a little bit of my Very Low Carb Flour Mix (or finely-ground almond flour, see note below), these “Not-So-Oopsie” Rolls had more structure, were less “wet” to hold as sandwiches, and tasted amazing!

 


I have to classify this bread as one of my low carb finds of the year. I didn’t have to tweak it for weeks and make twenty to thirty versions of it (like I did for pizza crust!). I didn’t have to figure out a way to mask some taste that I couldn’t stomach. It was “just right.”

 

Not-So-Oopsie Rolls

Make extra and store them in the freezer to have on hand anytime!

 

 

This bread has a mild flavor—not too non-grain-flour-tasting yet not too airy. I am one of the pickiest eaters I know—seriously, we are talking three or four non-starchy vegetables, and that is it! So when I say that you need to make these every week and put them in your freezer, you can trust me!

 

(I tell my kids that these taste sort of like King’s Hawaiian rolls without the flour and without bread texture or really any texture {that is why they are sometimes called cloud rolls!}. They don’t really believe me!)

 

Not-So-Oopsie Rolls

Need suggestions on how to use these? I carry them in my lunch bag (I always carry a lunch/snack bag with low carb options in it) and pull one or two out whenever I get a sandwich from a fast-food place or even when I have a sit down lunch with friends or my kids. (I know a lot of people love the bun-less burgers or lettuce-wrapped sandwiches, but I like to feel like I am eating a real sandwich!) They make amazing buns for breakfast sandwiches. I don’t even drool over my son’s Mickey Dee’s bacon-egg-and-cheese biscuit any more. A turkey sausage patty (that I also pulled out of the freezer, pre-cooked and ready to go—are you seeing a theme here—low carb secret? Be prepared!) on one of these is a perfect breakfast. I really love all sandwiches on this.

 

I have been experimenting with making various sizes of these. I love to make mini ones to use for mini sausage breakfast sandwiches or mini chicken salad or chicken finger sandwiches. Perfect!

 

Not-So-Oopsie Rolls

But savory isn’t the only use for these babies! Roll them in cinnamon-sugar (after baking or even when defrosted out of the freezer) and drizzle cream cheese frosting over them. Top them with sugar-free jam or no-sugar added pie filling. Sprinkle sugar-free chocolate chips over them, microwave until the chips are somewhat melted, and top with homemade whipped cream. Yum! Most recently, I have been making “jam sandwiches” out of two of them and packing them when I go teach. Makes me forget that I am on a “diet”!

 

 

Not-So-Oopsie Rolls

An amazing low carb treat is this Not-So-Oopsie Bread toppied with my BEST Sugar-Free Strawberry Jam and whipped cream!

 

 

Yeah, you need to make these!

 

Low Carb Oopsie Rolls

Don’t forget to scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page for this recipe’s helpful Recipe Keys!

 

Not-So-Oopsie Rolls
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • 6 eggs, separated
  • ½ tsp cream of tartar alone
  • 4 TBSP cream cheese (half a bar), softened
  • 4 TBSP butter (half a stick), melted
  • 4 TBSP Very Low Carb Flour Mix* (or finely ground almond flour—see note)
  • 1 TBSP sugar-free bulk sweetener**
  • 1 tsp baking soda and ½ tsp cream of tartar mixed together
  • ⅓ tsp salt
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 300 F, and spray cooking spray on parchment that is placed on large cookie sheet(s) or jelly roll pans. (May omit parchment, but who doesn’t love using parchment?)
  2. Separate egg whites from yolks.
  3. Place whites in one mixing bowl, and yolks in another mixing bowl.
  4. Add first cream of tartar (1/2 tsp) to egg whites and whip with stand mixer or hand mixer until stiff peaks form. (I love my Kitchen Aid for this—and most everything!) Set aside.
  5. Beat egg yolks in separate mixing bowl.
  6. To the beaten egg yolks, add softened cream cheese, melted butter, Very Low Carb Flour Mix*, bulk sweetener**, baking soda & cream of tartar mixture, and salt.
  7. Beat this egg yolk mixture until thoroughly combined.
  8. Gently fold egg yolk mixture into egg white mixture until combined (be careful not to stir or beat {should still be a whipped meringue texture}).
  9. Spoon mixture mounds onto cookie sheet (twelve to fourteen total mounds).
  10. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes convection (20 to 30 minutes regular), or until tops and edges are slightly browned. (Check at shortest cooking time.)
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1 roll Calories: 100 Fat: 9 Carbohydrates: 1 Sugar: 0 Protein: 4

PIN THIS RECIPE!

 

*Very Low Carb Flour Mix—a non-grain flour, low carb flour mix.  You may also use finely-ground almond flour by itself for this recipe, but the Very Low Carb Flour Mix combines non-grain, low carb flours so that no one type is too strong while still keeping a low carb count.

 

*Bulk sugar-free sweetener—sweeteners that can be used cup-for-cup like sugar work well in baked goods. See my downloadable sweetener chart.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save


Recipe Keys

 

Low Carb (LC): This is a very low carb recipe with a potential of only ½ to one carb per roll depending on whether you use the Basic Flour Mix or almond flour and how many you make per recipe.

 

Family-Friendly Low Carb (FFLC): I can’t say much about how FFLC these are as I only share them with my husband since they are a little time-intensive (compared with, say, a muffin in a mug!). Both of us like these!

 

Store-Bought-Stella (SBS): To save money, some cooks might prefer to use Splenda rather than a natural (but more expensive) sweetener like erythritol or xylitol.

 

Homemade Hannah (HH): This is very homemade! You can make this completely whole-foods as written above.

 

Freezer Cooking (FC): This isn’t in my monthly freezer entrees because I make it nearly weekly! And yes, I do freeze them with parchment between them, and they turn out great!

 

Oldie Goldie Family Recipes (OG): I have just begun making these with our low carb cooking and baking over the past year; however, if you are looking for a way to get more protein into your kids (and have less carby breads) or a way to utilize eggs or feed your kids more eggs, this recipe would be a great family recipe. You could even use white, wheat, oat, or gluten-free flour in place of the extremely low carb Basic Flour Mix—and still have a bread that is much healthier and lower in carbohydrates than most breads.

 

Trim Healthy Mama (THM): These could be used in an S setting or an E setting (if lower fat cream cheese were used). I think that with fat-free cream cheese, with only 1/3 of an egg yolk per roll and 1 tsp of butter per roll, you might be able to use one of these as a fuel pull (especially if you make the smaller version ones).

 

Sugar Free (SF): Sugar-free and healthy sweetener options!

 

Gluten Free (GF): This can definitely be gluten-free if using the gluten-free option of Basic Flour Mix and/or almond flour.

 

Low Carb Mixes (LCM): This recipe uses my Basic Flour Mix, a combination of low carb grain-less flours, such as almond flour, oat fiber, coconut flour, golden flax, protein powder, etc. This is a very low carb baking mix.

BEST Low Carb Biscuits

BEST Low Carb Biscuits

 

There is no doubt in my mind that in the three years that I have been baking low carb, I have made at least twenty different low carb biscuit recipes! Agghh…..that is a lot of expensive flour and even more time than I care to think about.

 

The bottom line is that we are picky! We are used to home cooked/home baked foods with white and wheat flours. Casseroles, roasts with potatoes, homemade pizza, lasagna, spaghetti casseroles, and pot pies were all dishes in my repertoire of recipes in thirty-four years of cooking and baking for a family of (eventually!) nine on one income.

 

And none of us have embraced the low carb baked goods with open arms! I talked about the idea of using as little low carb flour (even my Very Low Carb Flour Mix) as possible while enhancing dishes with more familiar tastes, such as cream cheese, pumpkin, zucchini, oatmeal, peanut butter, etc. (See “It’s All About Dilution” here.) These dishes have been much more readily accepted by my college and teen sons and hubby.

 

This recipe is a perfect example of that! Rather than having a 1 ½ to 2 cup low carb flour addition and the “regular” milk, butter, and baking powder that you often find in “normal” biscuits, this recipe has the flour “diluted” with cheese and cream cheese. And these biscuits are much tastier for it! 🙂

 

The recipe as given does not have as much rise (though the texture and taste are quite good!) as the biscuits with a little bit of Sprouted Flour Mix added. (See the side-by-side pictures below.) They really rise and have a very similar texture to soft white flour biscuits with just ¼ a cup of Sprouted Flour Mix subbed for some of the low carb flour mix. It is, of course, up to each baker as to whether she can afford the extra two carbs per biscuit that the sprouted flour adds—and also whether one can tolerate gluten (though sprouted flour is definitely less glutenous and not as hard on digestion as regular wheat flour).

 

I don’t want to discourage you from making them as the recipe is first given—they really are the best very low carb biscuits I have had. However, the more “family-friendly low carb” version is just that—family-friendly. Try them both ways!

 

Pin this recipe for later!

BEST Low Carb Biscuits

 Don’t forget to scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page for this recipe’s helpful Recipe Keys!

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in this recipe. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

BEST LOW CARB BUSICUITS
Author: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 8
 
Ingredients
  • 4 oz. cream cheese, softened (or sour cream or plain yogurt—may need more flour if mixture is too wet when using one of these)
  • 2 whole eggs
  • 1 TBSP butter (I am going to leave this out next time; I think the fat in the cream cheese and shredded cheese will be enough!)
  • ½ cup shredded cheese (Monterey Jack, cheddar, or “orange blend” for more savory biscuits; mozzarella cheese for sweet use)
  • ¾ cup Very Low Carb Flour Mix
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • 1 ½ tsp baking powder
  • Optional: 1 to 2 packets of sugar free sweetener (Pyure, etc.) (I add this when I make the biscuits with mozzarella cheese and want to make a sweeter type of biscuit rather than savory.)
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350º.
  2. Whisk cream cheese with mixer (love myKitchen Aid!).
  3. Beat in the eggs and butter (if using).
  4. Once cream cheese is incorporated fully with the eggs and butter (otherwise you will have little pieces of cream cheese here and there), add flour mix with soda and baking powder sprinkled into the flour mix.
  5. Mix thoroughly, and then add shredded cheese at end. (When I removed my mixing bowl from the mixer, I mixed further with a rubber spatula from the bottom as large mixers sometimes do not get all of the ingredients from the bottom of the bowl when mixing small amounts.)
  6. Drop by heaping tablespoons onto a parchment-lined (or sprayed with cooking spray) baking pan. I like to use a round pie pan and drop them in a “high heap” so that they rise better and do not spread out as much.
  7. Bake in convection oven for twelve to thirteen minutes (regular oven 13 to 16 minutes). Allow to sit in pan for a few minutes after removing pan from the oven.
  8. Makes eight medium-sized biscuits that are especially yummy with this awesome low carb, sugar-free . (I use mozzarella cheese when I am going to have the biscuits for shortcakes or with jam.)

PIN THIS RECIPE

 

Note: These are amazing with my Sugar-Free Strawberry Jam and/or Sugar-Free Crock Pot Apple Butter.

 

BEST Low Carb Biscuits

*Click here for Very Low Carb Flour Mix recipe

 

LowCarbBiscuits

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in the recipe above. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com.  If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission.  Thank you for your support of this blog!

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save


Recipe Keys

 

Very Low Carb (VLC): As mentioned above, these are very low carb. Be careful when choosing your shredded cheese. Some pre-shredded cheeses have carbs added to them (fillers, anti-clumping agents), and this will affect the carb count of the biscuits. As is, these are very low carb since the Basic Low Carb Flour Mix has only eight carbs in the ¾ cup of mix that this recipe calls for!

 

Family-Friendly (FF): To make these more family-friendly, I used ½ cup of the Very Low Carb Flour Mix and ¼ cup of my Sprouted Flour Mix. This adds almost-two carbs per biscuit. Again, the rise and texture of these is amazing, but whether you feel you can afford two more carbs per biscuit and/or whether you can tolerate the sprouted flour will make a difference in whether you choose this option. I would definitely combine flours in this recipe for serving to people who are not used to healthier biscuits.

 

Store-Bought-Stella (SBS: This is home-cooked baking—BUT SBS, rejoice! If you take the time to make the Very Low Carb Flour Mix, eight of these yummy biscuits can be whipped up in a stand mixer in five minutes!

 

Homemade Hannah (HH): HH’s should love my baking mixes, including this Very Low Carb Flour Mix! It makes home baking a snap!

 

Freezer Cooking (FC): These biscuits can definitely be frozen! (Check out the picture of my freezer bounty! Love to be prepared while others are eating high carb treats!) Just “flash freeze” on trays and then bag in zip-lock bags once they are frozen. (Or if you have freezer room, place them in plastic containers with parchment between…always parchment…I love parchment!)

 

BEST Low Carb BiscuitsThese biscuits freeze well!

 

Trim Healthy Mama-Friendly (THM) (www.trimhealthymama.com): These are very low carb biscuits when made with the Very Low Carb Flour Mix. This makes this an easy S for two biscuits! If you are not opposed to using sprouted wheat flour in an S setting, you can even get by with the FF version of these in an S setting.

 

Sugar Free (SF): No sugar here! It only takes a small amount of healthy sugar substitute to sweeten these up for sweeter applications. (Anxious to share my Cinnamon “Craisin” Biscuits With Cream Cheese Frosting someday using this!)

 

Save

Save

Very Low Carb Flour Mix

Very Low Carb Flour Mix

 

When I first began low carb baking seriously three years ago, I had way more failures than I did successes. No one flour seemed to make anything edible—especially for my sons and husband.

 

Almond flour was too heavy. I didn’t understand how much liquid/how many eggs to use with coconut flour—plus the texture was just off when I followed recipes using solely coconut flour. Don’t even get me started on the recipes I tried using straight flax or oat fiber.

 

Then I started reading about low carbers who were having success at combining non-grain flours. Caroline, from All Day I Dream About Food, and other healthy recipe bloggers used two thirds to three fourths almond flour and the remainder of coconut flour quite often in recipes.

Other low carbers had various combinations—and some were even in mix form (that you mix up and use cup-for-cup in place of regular flour). This appealed to me because I have been a “make a mix” cook for many years (starting twenty-five years ago this summer with the book Make a Mix Cookery).

 

Thus, I began a quest to combine low carb flours into a baking mix that my family would eat—and that didn’t taste so “off.” (I also began making various low carb mixes—cake mix, brownie mix, “Bisquick,” bbq base, cream cheese dessert base, and so on.

 

I have probably tried over twenty different variations in the past three years or so. I had tried putting in some “gluten free” flours (that bake more like white wheat flour) and oat flour—both in an effort to dilute the low carb-not-real-flours. The results were better tasting, but the carb count was a little high.

 

I then came to the conclusion that I needed a basic flour combination that I could live with—and then mix it with oat flour, sprouted wheat flour, and/or gluten free blends to get a more normal taste when I am baking for my kids.

 

I have since developed a Sprouted Flour Mix recipe that I use in yeast baking (yes, with low carb rolls and breads at five to eight net carbs each!!!)—and that I combine with this mix to get that more “normal” taste for times that I want healthy and fairly low carb but I want someone besides me to eat it! 🙂

 

(See my article, “The Power of Dilution,” here.)

 

I know that I will get asked if you can sub this or that—and you can. The combination is up to you and is dependent upon your budget, the availability of products, your family’s taste, and even your carb “budget.” I have put the approximate carb count of the products that I use in this mixture in parentheses.

 

I will say, though, that if you can bite the bullet and buy the products and make it one time, you will have the products for refills of the mix over and over since it uses small amounts of various things and since it is a bulk mix (makes a lot). (Then I recommend buying the products one at a time each month or however often you order or go to stores carrying the products, so that it will not feel overwhelming to continue making the mix cost-wise.)

 

I first published this on my homeschooling/parenting blog (Character Ink Press), and it is by far my most popular recipe. I have had many people write in telling me that after trying many low carb flour mixes, they tried this one and had great results. People often say that it acts the most like “regular flour” than any combination they have used!

 

 

General Guidelines for Substitutions:

 

(1) Obviously, any substitutions will potentially alter the final outcome of a recipe and the taste (at least from what my recipe tester and I got when we made it just as is). Keep that in mind when using substitutions.

(2) If you want to keep the mix super low carb (as it is written), be sure to substitute products with the same or similar carb count. (For example, oat fiber has a zero carb net count so if you substitute oat flour {at approximately eighty carbs per cup} for oat fiber, the carbohydrate total will be MUCH higher than a version with oat fiber.)

(3) You can also double some of the flours that have the same count and omit one. This would make fewer number of total products to buy, but you are going to miss a little bit of the dilution factor if you do not care for the taste of any one single flour.

(4) If you are making substitutions, I would be careful that the coconut flour is not more than twenty-five percent of the total mix since it requires much more moisture (especially eggs) in order to bake with it straight up. Your baked goods might be too dry with too much coconut flour.

(5) I gave a few suggestions in the recipe to help you with substitutions. If you are trying to just buy a couple of things to start with, you could do a combination of ½ almond flour, ¼ coconut flour, and ¼ oat fiber and then grow from there as your budget allows.

 

So….here is the final version (!). I will link recipes to this Very Low Carb Mix as I put them up.

Also, remember to watch for the e-book containing this mix!! It will likely follow Sugar-Free Solutions; Healthy Mixes: Sugar-Free, Flour-Free; Healthy Mixes: Cream Cheese Dessert Base. It will be called Healthy Mixes: Two Healthy Flour Mixes (Sprouted Flour Mix and Very Low Carb Flour Mix).

This blog is an incremental blog—if you start with the first e-book and move through them, you will learn how to cook and bake with healthy sugar-free substitutes, then flourless baking and candy making, then flour mixes, etc.—all from a curriculum author of seventy books totaling fifty thousand pages who loves to teach incrementally!

Thank-you for joining me!

Note: Given carb counts are from the products that I used and are all net carbs—total carbs minus fiber.

 

Download my Low Carb Flour Chart, complete with carb counts for many different kinds of low-carb flours!

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in this recipe. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

4.2 from 11 reviews
Very Low Carb Flour Mix
Author: 
 
Net Carbs (per cup): 10 grams
Ingredients
  • 3 cups almond flour (12 net carbs per cup–TOTAL 36)
  • 1 cup coconut flour (24 net carbs per cup–TOTAL 24)
  • ½ cup oat fiber OR ground golden flax (0 net carbs per cup–TOTAL 0)
  • ½ cup vital wheat gluten (OR if you do not want gluten in your mix, use 1 / 8* cup Xantham Gum; I love putting gluten in my low carb baked goods) (24 net carbs per cup–TOTAL 12)
  • Optional: ½ cup plain whey protein powder (OR may be omitted or just increase almond flour) (16 net carbs per cup–TOTAL 8)
Instructions
  1. Note: Carb counts vary among products. For example, some gluten free flours have 110 carbs per cup, while Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free Flour has eighty! Be sure to check carb counts on various products!
  2. Makes approximately six total cups. Each cup has approximately 12 NET carbs in it.
  3. Combine all ingredients thoroughly.
  4. Store in an airtight container.
Notes
*Xantham Gum: I previously forgot to put this in the recipe. If you substitute Xantham Gum for the Vital Wheat Gluten, you need to use half as much of it as the gluten. Sorry for the inconvenience!
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1 cup Calories: 580 Fat: 34 Carbohydrates: 10 Fiber: 42 Protein: 42

 

While this Basic Flour Mix can be used in place of almond flour alone or in place of any flours in a recipe (can be used to replace almond flour, coconut flour, and whey protein, for example, in a recipe that has all three of those items), here are a couple of my recipes to get you started using this mix:

1. Low Carb Crepes
2. Chicken Noodle Soup
3. BEST Low Carb Biscuits

 

very-low-carb-flour-mix-nutrition-label

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save


Save

 

Recipe Keys

 

Low Carb (VLC): This is about as low carb of a mixture that you will get in low carb baking (except for straight up flax or oat fiber). You could get approximately the same carb count with almond flour alone, but I don’t like feeding us huge handfuls of nuts over and over again every time we eat any baked good. (I know the low carb high fat people say it doesn’t matter, but it feels like it matters!) I also like the “dilution factor” of using multiple non-grain flours in a mix.

 

Family Friendly (FF): Again, to make this more Family-Friendly—or to just create a healthier baking mix for your family that is not reliant on processed or over-consumed white flour and other grains, you can do a couple of things: (1) Make this as it is listed and use it half and half with oat flour, quinoa flour, sprouted wheat, or other higher-carb flours that bake up more like regular grains; (2) Make this almost as it is given but use a higher carb flour for any of the really low ones. For example, if you use Bob’s Red Mill Oat Flour or sprouted white wheat flour for some of the flours, you can still end up with a forty-carb-per-cup mix that is healthy as opposed to a one-hundred-carb-per-cup grain (white or wheat flour) that is less healthy. Family-Friendly Low Carbing is a very healthy approach to baking! (3) Make this as is and use it combined with my Sprouted Flour Mix as needed to “dilute” the tastes.

 

Store-Bought-Stella (SBS): While this is not an SBS model, it is that mindset—get something you can use easily and quickly later so that you don’t have to spend so much time mixing flours, getting out various products all at once, etc. Make the mix once (or double it!), and you have a “homemade convenience food.”

 

Homemade Hannah (HH): This is very homemade! You can make this completely whole-foods as written above. Coming from a HH background myself (out of necessity of cooking for a family of nine on one income), I adore mixes and always have. If you are a HH who has never used mixes, keep following this blog. You will love what is coming up!
Freezer Cooking (FC): This isn’t in my monthly freezer entrees since it really isn’t an entrée; however, you can make up a double batch and store one in your pantry for everyday use and put one batch in the freezer for later.

 

Trim Healthy Mama-Friendly (THM) (www.trimhealthymama.com): This is an S baking mix as it is written due to the heavy almond flour amount. However, it could easily be made into a Fuel Pull or an E mix by reducing the amount of almond flour. For the FP, you would reduce the amount of almond flour and replace it with oat fiber. For the E mix, you would reduce the amount of almond flour and replace it with oat flour or sprouted wheat flour. Easy peasy! Also, like the suggestions above for the Family-Friendly folks, you could make it as it is listed and then use half and half—half Basic Low Carb Flour Mix and half oat fiber for FP OR half Basic Low Carb Flour Mix and half oat flour or sprouted wheat for E mix. (I do not do much FP or E baking, but I would make this mix as is and then combine it with Sprouted Flour Mix anytime you want to make an E baked good. Easy peasy!)

 

Sugar Free (SF): Sugar-free!

 

Gluten Free (GF): This can definitely be gluten-free if you do not add the gluten and you are sure your oat fiber is completely gluten free. Again, just like the Family-Friendly and the THM E mix options given above, if you are not after low carb but simply after healthier and gluten-free baking options, you may omit the lower carb flours (oat fiber, golden flax, etc.) and use part oat flour or part gluten-free flour. (Bob’s Red Mill Gluten-Free Flour is the lowest carb gluten-free flour I have found—by many carbs in some cases!) Also, you can do the option of making it as is and using half Basic Low Carb Flour Mix and half gluten-free flour for a healthier alternative to just gluten-free flour (which is often made with corn starch, rice flour, and other “white” flours).

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This
Share via
Copy link
Powered by Social Snap