Air Fryer Tips and Croutons (Low Carb Too!)

 

Air Fried croutons are crispy yet tender! Perfect Caesar salad!

 

My air fryer sat in its box for quite a while….Okay, it sat in its box for a few months. I just didn’t think I could handle learning anything else! And I wasn’t sure I wanted another appliance. And I was afraid I wouldn’t use it often enough to justify buying it. And…and…and….

 

When I finally got it out of the box, I realize that all of my fears were unfounded. It is truly amazing!

 

My husband and I eat at home most evenings–and we eat fairly healthfully. However, I have four grown sons and two sons-in-laws, and when they stop in, I often make them an “appetizer platter” from store bought frozen appetizers (mozarella sticks, taquitos, fish sticks…nothing healthy! lol). Seriously, they pick what they want out of my freezer bag of “appetizers for kids” and in fifteen minutes, they have a platter! (I’ve used it four times this week alone for them!)

 

Appetizers for my sons are super easy in the air fryer!

 

Then there’s my homemade breaded chicken tenders or fish planks. Amazing and fast.

 

Just bread and “fry”! Perfect chicken thighs. They look and taste like pan fried without the greasy taste or feel!

 

Or my weekly potato stand by–fingerlings, red, white wedges. Clean, put in the air fryer basket, spray with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook for 15 minutes or so. Perfection! No need to purchase pre-bagged potatoes at all when AIR FRIED homemade ones turn out this perfect.

 

But what do I use it for the most? Believe it or not, it is for perfect, low carb, crispy and yummy croutons! Oh they make our daily greens so wonderful! (Recipe below.)

 

Here are a few air fryer tips (many more coming!):

 

1) Get the biggest one you can afford.

I could barely cook for two in the first smallest, cheapest one I got. Now that I have upgraded to 9.4 quart one, I can cook a full meal for two at one time–in fifteen or twenty minutes!

 

2) Don’t be afraid to experiment.

Most things you can order at a restaurant are perfect homemade in the air fryer–grilled cheese, French fries, appetizers (store bought), quesadillas, hamaramas, chimichangas…oh the things you can make!

 

Love making all kinds of roasted potatoes in the air fryer!

 

3) Try veggies!

If you only need a small amount, the air fryer is the perfect place for those oven roasted veggies, Parmesan green beans, potato wedges, sweet potato fries, and more!

 

 

Love my 9.8 quart air fryer from Evine! Pretty and functional!

 

 

4) Try a smaller one first?

I have mixed ideas about this advice. I did it…..but then wanted a bigger one right away! My bigger, new one is Todd English 9.8 quart, but it is my second one after trying a smaller/less pricey one for a while first to be sure I would really use it. Mine came from a place called Evine.

 

 

As empty nesters, we have clean counters (and a clean kitchen!) for the first time ever. However, I still leave out my beloved air fryer!

 

 

Below are links to the ingredients and items I use in this recipe. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

5) Here are top rated ones from Amazon:

GoWise USA

“Super Deal”

Simple Chef

1400W

Power Air Fryer

Or here’s the link for the top rated ones all on one page

 

 


 

 

 

I would love to hear how families are using air fryers. I don’t see how a family of over four could efficiently use one–so send me your experience with this!

 

I love making croutons out of my Low Carb Sprouted Bread!

 

Air Fryer Croutons (Low Carb Too!) and Air Fryer Tips
Author: 
Serves: 4 servings
 
The nutritional info for this is based on low carb bread with a net carb of four carbs each and four total servings.
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Chop your slices of bread into medium chunks and place them in the Air Fryer.
  2. Spray or brush with olive oil and cook for 4 minutes on 400 degrees. (May mix herbs or garlic into your olive oil if desired.)
  3. Toss and cook longer if needed.
Nutrition Information
Calories: 65 Fat: 5 Carbohydrates: 2 Sugar: 0 Protein: 5

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Cheapest, “Normal-Tasting” Low Carb Flour Mix

Cheapest Normal Tasting Low Carb Flour Mix

 

Low carbers, gluten-free folks, Paleo peeps, and real foodies all have their favorite flour and flour combinations when it comes to baking healthier (or lower carb, or gluten-free, or real, etc). Most people who use alternative flours focus on their specific need or preference–whether they want fewer carbs, no grains at all, nothing processed, etc. Two things that are sometimes overlooked in this quest are how “normal tasting” the flour substitute is and the cost of the substitute. I know there are die hard healthy bakers who would never use a grain or never use a flour with over a dozen carbs….but there are others who are trying to navigate these new baking waters (especially those of us seeking lower carb who are not used to the unusual flavors or those who have sticker shock when they start purchasing low carb flour substitutes).

I like both of my flour mixes. And I use them for different purposes. Anyway I “slice” it, almond flour-based mixes do not yield good yeast breads for me. And sprouted flours only are still a little high for every day use when someone is trying to stay under fifty carbs or so. (Check out my two flour mixes here, or click on the image below to download a printable PDF of this chart.)

 

 

 

But I’ll be the first to admit that neither flour mix is “cheap” or inexpensive. They require numerous flours and many ingredients. (You should have seen my Amazon bills during the two years of testing them! 🙂 )

 

A reader recently asked about a comment that I made in a post about my flour mixes in which I said that you could try a combination of sprouted flour and almond flour to get a more reasonably-priced, simpler flour combination. She asked if this would work for yeast products, such as my sprouted flour crescent dough and low carb sprouted dinner rolls.

 

 

So…I give you my suggestion for the Cheapest, “Normal-Tasting” Low Carb Flour Mix–with several suggestions for using it to create lower carbed baked goods!

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in the recipe above. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

 

Cheapest, "Normal-Tasting" Low Carb Flour Mix
Author: 
 
Net carbs per cup: 35
Ingredients

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Here are the deets for this low carb flour mix:

1) This can be used in non-yeast products as is, including my biscuits, crepes, chocolate cake, and oopsie rolls.

 

2) It can be used in place of other low carb flour mixes or almond flour alone.

 

3) It is a low carb flour mix when compared to regular wheat flours (35 carbs per cup vs over 100 carbs per cup) and even when compared to coconut flour (at 24 carbs per cup). It isn’t almost no carbs (like almond flour at 12 carbs), but when you use, say, two cups of this mix spread out over 20 servings of something, you are at 3.5 carbs per serving; spread out over 10 servings, you are at 7 carbs per serving. These are low carb final products!

 

4) The taste is pretty “normal”! This would be a great starting mix for the new low carb cook.

 

 

 

 

5) Note that I use the finely-ground almond flour linked in the recipe and white sprouted wheat flour. Another almond flour that is not so finely ground will not yield the same texture. And a different sprouted flour might be higher in net carbs.

 

6) Obviously, if you are gluten-free, the sprouted flour would not be a good choice since it does contain gluten.

 

7) Finally, in answer to the reader about using a half-and-half combination like this in yeast products:

a. Half almond flour and half sprouted white flour will likely not rise in yeast baked goods. It is too heavy for yeast baking.

 

b. In my testing of diluting white sprouted flours with low carb items (gluten, sprouted wheat flour, and protein powder), there was a definite point where too much of the low carb product hindered the rise of the yeast product. I finally settled in at 80% sprouted white and wheat flour (with a 3:1 ratio of those) and 20% gluten/protein powder.

 

c. So…..if I wanted to try yeast dough using this combination rather than my Sprouted Low Carb Flour Mix, I would do something like this:

i. Start out with 2 cups white sprouted and 1/2 cup almond flour. (I would also add a TBSP or two of vital wheat gluten.) This will yield 48 net carbs per cup, which is still way under half of typical wheat flour!

ii. If that works well for you, you can keep trying to lower the white sprouted and increase the almond flour….at a 2:1 ratio (for example, 2 cups sprouted white and 1 cup almond…again, throw in two TBSP wheat gluten), your net carb count would be 41 carbs per cup. OR you can use half sprouted white and half sprouted wheat for the two cups and 1 cup almond flour….test this out with half a recipe to see what happens!

iii. Try these combinations in my sprouted crescent dough–and let me know how they work! 🙂

 

 

I know that last one is a lot of math—but I really want to help people simplify their baking while still being lower in carbs while having a normal tasting bread–if that is what they want. (And I understand the desire to save money on your baking AND the desire to bake things that others enjoy too!)

 

Happy low carb baking!

 


Hot Hamaramas/Hawaiian Sliders (With Low Carb Options!)

 

 

One of the beauties of creating something low carb that is as versatile as Low Carb Sprouted Crescent Dough (and the recent recipe post, Low Carb Sprouted Dinner Rolls) is being able to make so many formerly-high-carb foods into low carb foods. Once I got onto low carb bread making, dough, biscuits, crackers, Cream Cheese Dessert Base, candy, and so much more, I could look at a recipe that was previously off limits in low carb eating–and transform it into something low to moderate in carbs! Such was the case with our family’s long time favorite, Hot Hamaramas. (I have since found that they are called Hawaiian Sliders, ham and cheese sliders, baked ham sandwiches, and more. I have made these two two decades and always called them Hamaramas from a restaurant in my childhood hometown.)

 

These little sandwiches are perfect for low carbers and those desiring “real foods” ingredient-wise–until you get to the “sandwich” part, lol. They really aren’t the same with almond-flour biscuits or Oopsie Rolls. (Though I do recommend you make ham and cheese sandwiches and bacon-egg-cheese sandwiches on the Oopsie Rolls….they really are delicious!)

 

And these “sandwiches” definitely aren’t the same without any bread at all. So…enter low carb yeast breads (homemade or store bought).

 

 

I forgot to take a picture of my healthy dinner rolls the last time I made them, so here’s what the jelly roll pan looks like with the traditional rolls used.

 

 

Here are some tips for modifying these Hot Hamaramas / Hawaiian Sliderss for different types of cooks and eaters:

 

Family-Friendly

  • If your kids are not mustard fans, even my revised-less-mustard amount might be too much. One of our grown kids leaves out the mustard entirely when she makes this.
  • My guys like more meat and cheese than the recipe calls for!
  • I reduced the sauce in this recipe over the years from my original since I kept throwing half of it out. Even with the amount in the recipe as given, I don’t use all the sauce.

 

Real Foods

  • Make your low carb bread from my recipe or get your favorite healthy buns for this recipe.
  • If you want more real, yet still meltable cheese, you might try a combination of mozarella and farmers’ cheese or a softer goat cheese.

 

Low Carb

  • The meat, cheese, and sauce are all low carb, so no revisions needed there!
  • You can make these for 6 to 7 carbs per roll by using my Low Carb Sprouted Wheat Rolls OR purchase low carb hot dog buns and cut them in half to make two sandwiches out of each bun. These are pretty good “rectangular” slider buns that will still be low carb.

 

Traditional

  • These are perfect appetizer sandwiches, grad party and shower treats, brunch sandwiches, and more. I have served them at three of our four graduation parties, and people LOVE them—with the King’s Hawaiian Rolls, of course! 🙂
  • They are super fast to make in bulk. You can even make multiple pans of these without the sauce and cover them with foil and stick in fridge. Make your sauce and put in storage container. At serving time, just stir your sauce, brush it on, and pop in the oven.

 

 

P.S. Let me know how you made these–healthy for regular fare or with those amazing sweet Hawaiian rolls for a special occasion. And how your people enjoyed them! I am making them for our family’s Christmas Eve this year!

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in the recipe above. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

Hot Hamaramas/Hawaiian Sliders (With Low Carb Options!)
Author: 
Serves: 36 sandwiches
 
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Place parchment in huge jelly roll pan (or two large baking pans with sides).
  2. Slice the top of each roll and place each bottom in the jelly roll/baking pan.
  3. Layer the ham and cheese on each roll.
  4. Replace the tops of each roll.
  5. Combine the butter, poppy seeds, mustard, Worcestershire, and onion powder; mix well.
  6. Brush the sauce over the tops of the rolls.
  7. Cover the entire pan with foil and bake at 350° for 30 minutes or until the cheese melts.
  8. Uncover the pan and cook for 2 additional minutes. Serve warm.
Notes
Low Carb Version: With half a low carb hot dog bun or my low carb sprouted dinner roll, each hamarama should be approximately 8 net carbs. Nutritional information is given with the recipe using the store bought, White rolls.
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1 sandwich Calories: 191 Fat: 8 Carbohydrates: 18 Sugar: 6 Protein: 15

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Low Carb Sprouted Wheat Dinner Rolls

 

 

I explained all about my quest for low carb yeast dough–and how it resulted in a low carb sprouted flour mix that actually works to create yeast dough products at five to seven net carbs per serving–a few months ago. I have had many people write to tell me that they are trying it, and I am excited to have low carbers enjoying yeast baking along with me. That recipe (Low Carb Sprouted “Crescent Roll Dough”) has a lot of options for using the dough. However, people are still asking for specifics about this or that–how to make the exact dinner rolls in the picture or how to make a thin pizza crust or how to create full sized loaves of bread. So I am going to be breaking down the recipe for individual items, starting with the exact dinner rolls in the pictures! (Watch the blog for recipes using these rolls, such as Low Carb Hamaramas (or Hawaiian Ham and Cheese Sliders) and more!)

 

 

One of my favorite low carb snacks is softening one of these rolls (or a breadstick, if I made breadsticks out of the dough) and dipping it into melted cheese or beer cheese or nacho cheese. Such a treat for so few carbohydrates! Of course, they are perfect with a “Sunday dinner” with butter. Or with garlic butter spread over them and toasted in the oven or air fryer for a meatball dinner or chicken parmesan. Or with butter and sugar-free jam. Or….or….or. They are just yummy!

 

Low Carb Sprouted Wheat Dinner Rolls

These low carb dinner rolls are so versatile! Here are some options for using this dough as dinner rolls:

 

 

1) After the first rise, shape and let rise again then bake immediately.

 

2) After the first rise, shape into balls and flash freeze on trays. Once frozen, drop into zip lock bags and place in freezer until needed. (I do this in 36 balls and then those balls are ready to be defrosted and shaped into dinner rolls, slider buns, crescent rolls, small breadsticks, or miniature Long John sweet rolls!)

 

Low Carb Sprouted Wheat Dinner Rolls

 

3) After the first rise, divide into three parts and shape into three balls for three plentiful “tubes” of healthy crescent dough. Freeze these balls for later use.

 

4) Refrigerate dough (be sure you have a large bowl with a tight lid as dough will rise over a period of time in the refrigerator) and pull out and use pieces of it as needed over a week to ten day period of time. This will be considered the first rise.

 

Note: If you are trying to use the refrigerated or the frozen dough, you will need a significant amount of rise time. For the frozen dough, you can defrost partially on counter then move to the fridge. When you take dough out of the refrigerator to use, you will punch it down and then let it rise for two to three times the normal time as it chill has to leave it and then it starts to rise. This process is long, so be sure to allow significant rise time for any cold dough!

 

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in the recipe above. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!


Low Carb Sprouted Wheat Dinner Rolls { Low Carb, Sugar-Free, THM Crossover or S}
Author: 
Serves: 36 rolls
 
YIELD: 3 “batches” of dough with 12 rolls in each batch; 36 servings for entire recipe Net Carbs per "batch" = 81. Per serving = 6.75 net carbs per dinner roll
Ingredients
  • 3 heaping TBSP dry yeast (2½ packets)
  • ½ cup bulk granulated Pyure* (0 net carbs) (or Gentle Sweet or Homemade Pyure, or other stevia blend) *Or use 1 cup cup of a cup-for-cup granulated sugar sub
  • 1⅓- 1 ½ cup unsweetened almond milk heated to 100-110 degrees F (or water, half and half, coconut milk, cashew milk, etc.) ( 0 net carbs)
  • 4 cups Low Carb Sprouted Flour Mix (36 net carbs per cup; 144 total)
  • 2 cups white wheat sprouted flour (48 net carbs per cup; 96 total)
  • 1 to 1 ½ tsp salt
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • ½ cup melted butter ( but not hot)
Instructions
  1. Combine yeast and sweetener in mixer.
  2. Pour in warm liquid and stir. Let this sit for ten minutes or so. (If using Rapid Rise yeast, this sitting step is not needed.)
  3. Combine flour mix, extra sprouted flour, and salt in another bowl and set aside.
  4. Add beaten eggs to yeast mixture as mixer is running.
  5. Add melted butter to yeast mixture.
  6. Add flour mixture with machine running using the dough hook attachment (if you are not going to knead manually).
  7. If you are kneading it by hand, mix until all is combined, remove from bowl, and knead for 8 to 10 minutes, adding flour mix as absolutely needed while still keeping fairly wet dough.
  8. If using dough hook, knead at Level TWO for 5 to 7 minutes. Add flour mix as absolutely needed while still keeping dough very wet.(This is an enriched dough. Part of its versatility is due to its softness/moistness. You want the dough to be so wet that you can just pick it up and it still sticks to your hands, but not so wet that it can’t be picked up.)
  9. Lift the dough up and grease the bowl. Place dough back into bowl and grease the top of the dough as well.
  10. Let dough rise in 85’, draft free area for 1 ½ hours. (I turn my oven on to 350 for one minute, then turn it off, and put my dough in the warm oven to rise.)
  11. To bake immediately, shape into 12 balls per batch (36 total balls) and let rise again for 45 to 60 minutes (will not fully double the second time).
  12. Bake a dozen round balls in a round pan or pie pan into rolls at 375 degrees for 15 to 18 minutes regular oven; 12 to 15 minutes convection until rich, golden brown (three dozen total for three pans with one recipe*)
  13. Remove from oven and brush with butter. (I have always placed a clean, damp tea towel on my finished baked yeast products as they cool. I like the way this softens the edges and tops of the baked goods.)
  14. *I often shape and bake one pan of rolls right away and refrigerate or freeze the other two "parts" of dough for another time. Or I go ahead and do one batch of dinner rolls, one loaf of bread, and one pizza crust. (See the original recipe linked above and future recipes for breads and pizza crusts.)
Notes
I do not usually take the time to form crescent rolls. However, here are the steps for those who want fancier looking dinner rolls.

1) When done rising, divide in thirds, rolling each third into a 12-inch circle ¼ inch thick.

2) Spread with the soft butter and cut each circle into 12 to 16 wedges, depending on how many and how large you want your crescents.

3) Roll up each wedge beginning at the largest end and place, point side down, on a greased baking sheet. Curve to form crescents.

4) Cover and let rise until doubled, approximately 1 hour. (I use three separate pans when I do all three thirds of dough at one time.)

5) Bake at 375 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes regular oven; 9 to 12 minutes convection until rich, golden brown (three dozen total for three pans with one recipe).

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P.S. Let me know how your low carb sprouted dinner rolls turn out! And tell me what you served them with! 🙂

Two Low Carb Flour Mixes and Their Uses

2 Flour Mixes & Their Uses

 

Since I published my two low carb flour mixes, I have gotten questions concerning when to use each one, etc. So until I get the dozens of recipes up that go with each mix, I thought I would write a general post about the mixes, direct you to some recipes using them, etc. So this post will detail more about my Very Low Carb Flour Mix and my Sprouted Low Carb Flour Mix!

 

First of all, check out the handy chart that shows carb counts in each of my flour mixes as well as other low carb (and non low carb) flours.

PIN THIS CHART HERE!

Here’s a handy list about my two flour mixes:

 

Very Low Carb Flour Mix

1) Great alternative for almond flour, coconut flour, or other low carb combination

2) Dilutes the flavors of the low carb flours so you don’t taste one specific one over the others

3) Has lower fat count than almond flour alone and lower carb count than coconut flour alone

4) Is more user-friendly in substituting for “regular” flours than any one low carb flour

5) Is great for crusts, cookies, bars, breading, muffins, quick breads, and more

6) Does not work for yeast products as it is missing gluten, which causes baked goods to rise (in substituting, if a recipe calls for almond flour, you can use this mix)

7) Is “very” low carb because of the very low carb products that are used to make this mix

8) Is lower in calories than almond flour

Click here for the Very Low Carb Flour Mix recipe!

 

Sprouted Low Carb Flour Mix

1) Great alternative for times you want to make yeast products or want something to be low to moderate in carbs but want people who are “very low carb flour” skeptics to enjoy it too

2) Has a lower fat count than almond flour and slightly higher carb count than coconut flour

3) Is super user friendly in low carb and regular recipes

4) Is great for everything, including yeast products and thickening

5) DOES work for yeast products—though you will need to experiment (see my “Crescent Roll Dough” recipe for ideas)

6) Is low/moderate in carbs (wayyyy lower than most wheat or white flour combinations…much closer to coconut flour in carb count) because of the diluting of the higher carb products

7) Is lower in calories than most

Click here for the Sprouted Low Carb Flour Mix

 

Here are some uses for each of these mixes. Click or tap on the images below to view the recipes:

 

BEST Low Carb Biscuits

Incredible Chocolate Cake [Low Carb, Gluten Free, Sugar-Free, THM]

 

Low Carb Sprouted Crescent Roll Dough Recipe

 

And you can visit my Healthy Mixes page for even more great recipes using these flours!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P.S. What recipes would you like to see using either of these mixes? I have probably already been testing it! 🙂

9 Low Carb Flours and Their Nutritional Info (Infograph for Easy Reference!)

9 Low Carb Flours and Their Nutritional Info (Infograph for Easy Reference!)

 

In my four years of low carb baking and cooking, I have tried them all. Some have turned out great. And some not so great. Baking with low carb “flours” can be challenging. They just don’t act like the flours we are used to baking with. They don’t taste like them either! So what do you do with almond flour, coconut flour, flax, oat fiber, and more? Which low carb flours are truly low and which are not? What about incorporating other flours together to make a more acceptable-to-family flour mix or flour blends?

 

read more…

Low Carb Sprouted “Crescent Roll” Dough (aka Low Carb “Pilsbury Crescent Dough”) { Low Carb, Sugar-Free, THM Crossover or S}

Low Carb Sprouted Crescent Roll Dough Recipe

INTRODUCING MY DOUGH BABY

I make many low carb “doughs” and “batters.” I don’t mind a cream cheese and mozzarella biscuit. I actually love breakfast sandwich fillings or jam on my “Not So Oopsie” rolls. (And they’re also good made into “cream cheese danishes”!) I like my crepe recipe—both savory and sweet. But oh for yeast dough! And even more oh for low carb yeast dough…and low carb rolls, low carb pizza dough, low carb cinnamon rolls and more—made out of more “real tasting” flours!

 

I’m not a fan of some of the doughs available for low carb or healthy bakers. I don’t like trying to pass off a “quick bread” (i.e. in a mug) or with flax and oat fiber as a bread. I don’t like the feel on my teeth (okay, they make me cringe a little) of doughs that are primarily made of cheese (or the flavor or the fat and calorie content!). And I really don’t like the taste of psyllium husk in a batter.

 

Yes, those doughs and batters are extremely low carb (often low carb/high fat/super calorie dense), which makes them ideal for keto situations. But I haven’t enjoyed them too much.

 


Add to that the fact that I love to make bread. Not in a coffee mug or out of cheese or eggy-clouds on a cookie sheet. But real bread.

 

Low Carb Sprouted Bread Dough

They actually look, taste, and feel like full carb wheat rolls!

 

Moreover, I like to make dough. Dough that can be kneaded and pounded and shaped and even played with. Dough that can be made into anything I want to for breakfast, lunch, or dinner—pizza, dinner rolls, slider buns, cinnamon bread, wiener wraps, “hot pockets,” danishes, and much more. (There were many, many years when we had seven children at home that we made bread every single morning!)

 

So for nearly two years now, I have been on a quest to create a flour mix that could be made into a bona-fide low carb yeast dough—out of real wheat flour and yeast. (I know many low carbers don’t eat any wheat products. I know that many people eat gluten-free. But I also suspect that there are enough of us out there who can tolerate wheat when it is sprouted and a little lower in carbs. And I think there are people out there who want to make more traditional yeast products for their family without using flour that is over 100 net carbs per cup!)

 

 

Low Carb Sprouted Crescent Roll Dough Recipe

Mini loaves and dinner rolls!

 

So here it is….my labor of love to myself, my family, and anybody else who wants to make a yeast dough that they can go crazy with—at only six to eight net carbs per serving! That number easily fits into a moderate carb diet of 30 to 60 net carbs per day. It is a dough that we can make for our families without super high carb numbers. And it is a dough that is so versatile that I call it my “Pilsbury Crescent Dough” knock off! (Go ahead, try it in recipes calling for a tube of Pillsbury Crescent Dough—it’s amazing!)

 

 

Low Carb Sprouted Crescent Roll Dough Recipe

Weiner wraps in a pig blanket rising

 

Now, I have to give a disclaimer or two. It is low carb. It contains sprouted flour. It contains a combination of white and wheat flours. It has gluten and protein powder in it. It isn’t REALLY Pilsbury Crescent Dough. (To get the exact low carb sprouted flours that I use, check out my Amazon shopping list below!)

 

But it is good. And for low carb, it is great! It is one of the few doughs and batters that my adult kids will eat when they come to dinner. I serve these rolls and loaves all the time. (I even give them away a lot…two years of testing has yielded way more dough than we two empty nesters can eat!)

 

Low Carb Sprouted Crescent Roll Dough Recipe

Breadsticks!

CRESCENT DOUGH DETAILS

There are so many things I want to tell you about this dough. (There actually might be a book in the future with just this dough as its basis!) But this post is going to get super long (sorry!), so I’m just going to detail the things you absolutely must know here—and you can learn more from the pictures and Recipe Keys beneath the recipe—and in future recipes using this dough.

 

1. The carb counts given are very exact—for the flours that I use (follow the affiliate links), in the amounts that I use the ingredients, divided among 36 servings (three “parts” of dough come from one recipe). If you use other flours, the carb counts will not be the same. (If you make larger servings, it will not be the same!)

2. The carb counts are net carbs—that is, they are grams of carbohydrates minus fiber. If you count gross carbs (before subtracting fiber or stevia, etc.), your carb count will be much higher.

3. This is an enriched dough. That means that it is not simply flour, yeast, and water. It has butter, almond milk, eggs, sweetener, etc. (I tried to tell my kids that it was a healthy ‘King’s Hawaiian Bread,” but they didn’t buy it!) This means that it is richer and denser than traditional non-enriched doughs. The fact that it is an enriched dough, combined with the fact that it is not all flour, means that it will not rise as quickly or even as high as other white breads, for instance. I have tested and tested this to get the best rise that I could get—and I settled in on adding some white sprouted flour to my Sprouted Flour Mix. You could use all Sprouted Flour Mix for a lesser rise and fewer carbs (or all white sprouted flour for a great rise, but much less nutrition and way more carbohydrates.)

4. The wetness of the dough is crucial. This is not a dough that you keep adding flour until you can handle it without it sticking to your hands. You want it to be wet enough to stick to your hands. Don’t over-flour your counter. Put a huge piece of parchment down and spray it with cooking spray. Spray your hands with cooking spray. Add only enough flour as is absolutely necessary. It should be sticky. If you add too much flour, it will not rise well, and it will have a crumbly crumb (!). It still tastes great like this—I love the crumbly version with stew, beans, or soup—but it doesn’t taste or feel like crescent dough then.

5. I will post the recipes that I use this in very soon—but in the meantime, get creative! I have made wiener wraps, sausage bits, ham and cheese roll ups, cinnamon rolls, fried doughnuts, pizza crust, hot pockets, mini loaves, small bread loaves, pizza knots, breakfast pizza, hot dog buns, and much more over the two years that I have tested it.

6. Use this dough according to your purpose and health goals. I can easily eat one or two servings of this every day and still stay in my carb zone. (Note: For thin pizza dough, it is only four net carbs per serving or so! It makes a huge jelly-roll pan of thin crust pizza!)

 

 

Low Carb Sprouted Pillsbury Dough

Amazing Cinnamon Bread! 

Don’t forget to scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page for this recipe’s helpful Recipe Keys!

Below are links to the ingredients I use in the recipe above. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

Low Carb Sprouted "Crescent Roll" Dough (aka Low Carb "Pilsbury Crescent Dough") { Low Carb, Sugar-Free, THM Crossover or S}
Author: 
 
YIELD: 3 “batches” of dough with 12 servings in each batch; 36 servings for entire recipe Net Carbs per "batch" = 81; per serving = 6.75 net carbs
Ingredients
  • 3 heaping TBSP dry yeast (2½ packets)
  • ½ (up to ⅔ for sweet dough) cup bulk granulated Pyure* (0 net carbs) (or Gentle Sweet or Homemade Pyure, or other stevia blend) *Or use 1 cup to 1⅓ cup of a cup-for-cup powdered sugar sub
  • 1⅓- 1 ½ cup unsweetened almond milk heated to 100-110 degrees F (or water, half and half, coconut milk, cashew milk, etc.) ( 0 net carbs)
  • 4 cups Low Carb Sprouted Flour Mix (36 net carbs per cup; 144 total)
  • 2 cups white wheat sprouted flour (48 net carbs per cup; 96 total)
  • 1 to 1 ½ tsp salt
  • 4 eggs, beaten
  • ½ cup melted butter ( but not hot)
Instructions
  1. Combine yeast and sweetener in mixer.
  2. Pour in warm liquid and stir. Let this sit for ten minutes or so. (If using Rapid Rise yeast, this sitting step is not needed.)
  3. Combine flour mix, extra sprouted flour, and salt in another bowl and set aside.
  4. Add beaten eggs to yeast mixture as mixer is running.
  5. Add melted butter to yeast mixture.
  6. Add flour mixture with machine running using the dough hook attachment (if you are not going to knead manually).
  7. If you are kneading it by hand, mix until all is combined, remove from bowl, and knead for 8 to 10 minutes, adding flour mix as absolutely needed while still keeping fairly wet dough.
  8. If using dough hook, knead at Level TWO for 5 to 7 minutes. Add flour mix as absolutely needed while still keeping dough very wet.(This is an enriched dough. Part of its versatility is due to its softness/moistness. You want the dough to be so wet that you can just pick it up and it still sticks to your hands, but not so wet that it can’t be picked up.)
  9. Lift the dough up and grease the bowl. Place dough back into bowl and grease the top of the dough as well.
  10. Let dough rise in 85’, draft free area for 1 ½ hours. (I turn my oven on to 350 for one minute, then turn it off, and put my dough in the warm oven to rise.)
  11. Do whatever you want with this dough!
  12. a. Shape it and let it rise to bake immediately.
  13. b. Shape it and flash freeze on trays then drop dough into zip lock bag and place in freezer until needed. (I like to do this in 36 balls—ready for rolls, slider buns, or crescent rolls or in 36 small logs for small breadsticks or miniature long john donuts. Lastly, you can freeze it in three small balls for three plentiful “tubes” of healthy crescent dough. (See dough idea list above.)
  14. c. Refrigerate dough(be sure you have a large bowl with a tight lid as dough will rise over a period of time in the refrigerator) and pull out and use pieces of it as needed over a week to ten day period of time. (Rise time will need increased significantly if dough is chilled when you start the second rising process.)
  15. To bake immediately, shape and let rise again for 45 to 60 minutes (will not fully double the second time). (Let pizza crust rise half the time.)
  16. Baking instructions for various products:
  17. a. Bake a dozen round balls in a round pan or pie pan into rolls at 375 degrees for 15 to 18 minutes regular oven; 12 to 15 minutes convection until rich, golden brown (three dozen total for three pans with one recipe).
  18. Bake three small loaves of bread (one recipe) at 350’ for 25 to 30 minutes with an internal temperature of 200 to 210’. Carbs per loaf 81; 12 slices at 6.75 carbs each piece.
  19. b. To form crescents: When done rising, divide in thirds, rolling each third into a 12-inch circle ¼ inch thick. Spread with the soft butter and cut each circle into 12 to 16 wedges, depending on how many and how large you want your crescents. Roll up each wedge beginning at the largest end and place, point side down, on a greased baking sheet. Curve to form crescents. Cover and let rise until doubled, approximately 1 hour. (I use three separate pans when I do all three thirds of dough at one time.) Bake at 375 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes regular oven; 9 to 12 minutes convection until rich, golden brown (three dozen total for three pans with one recipe).
  20. c. Remove from oven and brush with butter. (I have always placed a clean, damp tea towel on my finished baked yeast products as they cool. I like the way this softens the edges and tops of the baked goods.)

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Download my Low Carb Flour Chart, complete with carb and nutrition counts for many different low-carb flours!

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Recipe Keys

 

 

Low Carb (LC): The net carbs for this recipe are fairly low per serving (a cinnamon roll for under eight carbs?). However, keto people will likely not be able to use this dough (staying under twenty net carbs usually means non-starchy veggies, meat, cheese, eggs, and a few nuts). If you are longing for “dough” and eat thirty to sixty net carbs per day, give this recipe a try! It might be just the thing that will help you stay on your healthy eating program!

 

Family-Friendly Low Carb (FFLC): A very family-friendly dough recipe—actually the lowest carb one I have found for the taste and “normalcy” of it.

 

Store-Bought-Stella (SBS): This is not a quick recipe (though with a Kitchen Aid dough hook, I can have this rising in the bowl in under fifteen minutes!). However, I hope to help Store-Bought-Stellas to be able to cook and bake more and more by using my mixes. Once you make a mix, it is truly like using a store bought mix! I recommend that SBS cooks make the dough twice—and freeze the dough in one-third parts wrapped in parchment and placed down into a freezer bag (one third of a recipe per bag). You will be surprised how much more efficient the time you do spend in the kitchen will become when you have some things in the freezer!

 

Homemade Hannah (HH): We Homemade Hannah’s are in homemade heaven with yeast dough. What can feel more homemade than bread rising on the counter? Ahhhh….

 

Freezer Cooking (FC): This dough freezes well after the first rise. Keep in mind that when you defrost it, you will need a long time to get it to room temperature and then a long time to get it to rise. (Cold dough does rise, but it does so very slowly.) Freeze the dough in one-third parts wrapped in parchment and placed down into a freezer bag (one third of a recipe per bag). You can let it defrost in that bag until it is not cold and ready to shape. (You can also let it defrost in the refrigerator overnight or all day.)

 

Trim Healthy Mama-Friendly (THM) (www.trimhealthymama.com): This recipe is tricky to evaluate in the THM world. It is sprouted, which is normally an E food. However, it is enriched, which could make it an S. It is also low enough in carbs to be an S if you go by carb count only (which THM does not do). Many THM followers eat sprouted bread in an S setting if it stays in the carb levels of an S. So S? Low enough in fat for an E? Cross-over? I would use it in an E (with low fat toppings only) or an S (and slather it with butter!).

 

Sugar Free (SF): Yes, of course!

 

Gluten Free (GF): No. My Low Carb Flour Mix is a gluten-free, very low carb baking mix for non-yeast baking. Gluten-free eaters may use it freely. This recipe contains my Sprouted Flour Mix, which has sprouted white flour, sprouted wheat flour, vital wheat gluten, and protein powder. That being said, if you are not celiac but simply avoid gluten as much as you can for other reasons, you might want to make a small recipe of the Sprouted Flour Mix and try it in a small recipe (like a muffin in a mug) to see how you react. Some people do not react as badly to sprouted flours as they do regular flours. (Note: Follow your doctor’s orders, not my suggestions!)

 

Low Carb Mixes (LCM): Yep! Another of my fantastic mixes! I love baking and cooking with mixes!

Low Carb Sprouted Flour Mix

I have been a mad scientist for the last couple of years! Well, my grown kids and hubby who teach biology, anatomy, chemistry, and physics in our homeschool Cottage Classes would beg to differ. They would say that I don’t have a scientific bone in my body.

 

Low Carb Sprouted Flour Mix

 

But I know the truth. Because technically, low carb and healthy baking is nothing if not scientific experimentation!

 

I work from home full time now that I have graduated my last child from homeschooling. I take care of my Plexus customers and Ambassadors, help people get healthy, write curriculum, blog, prepare parenting and homeschooling seminars and workshops, and create recipes. It’s busy…but I love it. It feels like my thirty-two years of homeschooling but with only myself to keep on track all day.

 

Every morning I sit down and work, work, work and write, write, write. (Fifty thousand pages of curriculum didn’t just write itself the past fifteen years!)

 

And then I take a “break.” And rather than playing or eating lunch or running errands—I head to my kitchen and start my concoctions, sure that today’s will be a success.

 

Recipe testing is a break for me from sitting for too many hours. And it is a fun journey. Oh, sometimes I am sorely disappointed, for sure.

 

But many times—like in the case of this Low Carb Sprouted Flour Mix—I am overjoyed.

 

(And then I’m disappointed again. Then overjoyed again. Every day can’t be hearts, sunshine, flowers, and rainbows…or perfect low carb rolls, healthy pie, tasty sugar-free candy, and perfect grain-free cookies!)

 

This is like Book V or VI in the Healthy Mixes series, which means it won’t get as tested as early as the recipes in Sugar-Free, Flour-Free or Cream Cheese Dessert Base. However, it is being tested a little here and there—and the recipes that go with this mix will be posted as they pass the test!

 

I am especially excited about the master “Crescent Roll Dough” recipe that I have been testing for eight months using this mix. It is so close to being ready—and will be a healthy mixes, low carb yeast baker’s delight as it is sooo versatile. (Think Pillsbury Crescent Rolls in a tube….yeah…so many uses!) So stay tuned. (Subscribe at the end of this post, so you will get each recipe in your inbox as they are published!)

 

Below are links to the ingredients I use in this recipe. I am an affiliate for Amazon.com. If you click on the links below I will earn a small commission. Thank you for your support of this blog!

 

So while you wait on my testing, here are some uses for this amazing Sprouted Flour Mix

1) Use as is in place of bread flour for your own yeast dough experimentation! No, it doesn’t rise and get fluffy like white flour bread and rolls, but when you consider a roll with this has like six to ten carbs instead of twenty to thirty carbs (and has healthy ingredients), I think you’ll agree that it is worth a little denseness to have yeast products while not veering from your healthy eating plan. (This flour works especially well in recipes that are sometimes called “egg enriched.” That is, doughs that have other ingredients besides flour, yeast, and water. Doughs with fewer ingredients tend to rely on the gluten and the “fluffiness” of traditional wheat/glutenous flours to rise properly.)

2) Use a ratio of 2:1 or 3:1 of this mixture and the Very Low Carb Flour Mix or almond flour for non-yeast yet less “different tasting” baking. (See Power of Dilution here.) This takes the per cup carb count down to 30 (for 2:1) or 33 (for 3:1). For many things, I use half and half (1:1 ratio). This works well for anything with a lot of other ingredients/flavors, such as zucchini or banana bread/muffins, cream cheese items, peanut butter cookies and bars, etc. (I even use my Very Low Carb Flour Mix alone for those types of baking since the flavors of the other ingredients dilute the different tasting flours of almond, flax, coconut, etc.

3) Use this as is for a moderate to low carb baking mix but a more normal taste for those not accustomed to the grain-less low carb flours in the Very Low Carb Flour Mix. To give you some comparisons, one cup of straight up almond flour often has a net carb count of 12; coconut flour 24; white flour 92; wheat flour 74; gluten-free flour mix 120 (Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free All Purpose Baking Flour) Those are important numbers for those using a net carb count as their primary index of healthy ingredients in baking, which I know everybody doesn’t do, but if you’re serious about overcoming sugar addiction and eating more healthfully, items with lower carbs and lower on the Glycemic Index will have a huge impact.

4) For yeast baking, I recommend not using the mixed version (with the Very Low Carb Flour Mix). I have not had good success with yeast doughs and grain-less flours. As a matter of fact, my favorite healthy yeast baked goods have this sprouted flour mix along with additional sprouted wheat or white flour. Still fairly low carb, great on glycemic index, and healthful ingredients! Stay tuned!

5) Download my Low Carb Flour Chart, complete with carb counts for many types of low-carb flours!

 

 

 

LOW CARB SPROUTED MIX
Author: 
 
Net Carbs (per cup): 36 grams
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Combine fully.
  2. Store in air-tight container for many months.
  3. Use cup-for-cup in place of regular flour, healthy flour mixes, etc.
Nutrition Information
Serving size: 1 cup Calories: 480 Fat: 1 Carbohydrates: 60 Fiber: 24 Protein: 16

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Recipe Keys

 

Very Low Carb (VLC): This flour mix is not necessarily VERY low carb. It is world’s better than other wheat flour or non-low-carb-gluten-free flour mixes. It can be incorporated into a non-keto low carb diet easily when you either use it sparingly (i.e. 2 cups for 80 net carbs in a pan of bars that feeds 20 is still an extremely low carb option) or use it combined with my Very Low Carb Flour Mix (or almond flour).

 

Family-Friendly (FF): This mix is a great place to start to begin baking with lower carb/lower Glycemic Index flours. It is not as unusual-tasting as my Very Low Carb Flour Mix, and even though it is glutenous, sprouted flours are often easier to digest for gluten-free people (though obviously not for persons with celiac disease).

 

Store-Bought-Stella (SBS): Mixes are homemade cooking—BUT, they have the ease of use that other homemade cooking often does not have. Many of the mixes are literally a click away for ordering products on Amazon then a fifteen minute mix up, and you have healthy mixes that are found by the boatload in non-healthy versions on store shelves. SBS can love mixes as much a Homemade Hannah’s with a little pre-planning and small snatches of time.

 

Homemade Hannah (HH): Cooks who love spending time in their kitchens coming up with all manner of homemade items will love both of my flour mixes.

 

Freezer Cooking (FC): This can be stored in the freezer though it isn’t necessary.

 

Trim Healthy Mama-Friendly (THM) (www.trimhealthymama.com):  This mix can definitely be incorporated into the THM diet—though how you do that is a personal preference. It can definitely be used in E’s easily. In S applications, it depends on whether you are a purist or not. If you use sprouted low carb breads in S meals (in spite of sprouted flours being traditionally E products), then you can definitely use this in S baking. (See Very Low Carb notes above.) Additionally, I am toying with how this, combined with my Very Low Carb Flour Mix might fit into Fuel Pull recipes (on a strictly carb and fat count basis only). Let me know how you use both of them!

 

Sugar Free (SF): All of the Healthy Mixes e books, blog posts, and newsletters contain only sugar-free recipes.

 

Gluten-Free (GF): Obviously, those with celiac disease should not experiment with even sprouted flours. However, those with gluten-intolerance can often use sprouted flours without trouble because they are more easily digested. Another option is to combine this mix half and half with my Very Low Carb Flour Mix for an even lower gluten combination. (I do this all the time!) Regardless, both of my flour mixes are healthier in terms of Glycemic Index, real ingredients, and carb counts than the average gluten-free flour blend. (See carb numbers in the opening of this recipe.)

 

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